April 6, 2017 James Burke

User Acceptance Testing Sheds Light On Value of Participant Feedback

It’s about that time, folks! Time to analyze our latest round of User Acceptance Testing (UAT). When creating memorable user experiences, it’s important to gather feedback from users before a final product goes to market. With every digital experience we create, this step plays an integral role in the project’s success. And this one’s for a mobile app which is really exciting!

The Process

For this iteration of UAT, we reached out to a total of 11 participants who served as key stakeholders in this process. These are some of the people who will frequently use the app and also know the ins-and-outs of what the experience should offer. We created a UAT Test Plan that walked our users, screen by screen, through the key functions of the app. The plan contained columns for screen ID’s, desired functionality, expected results, comments/notes, and the part that mattered most — an acceptance (pass/fail) column.

Over the course of 5 days, we were able to gather responses from all users and record them in Jira to prioritize them into upcoming builds. There are also tools you can use to gather feedback via a Feedback tab, like Usabilla, and many UAT testers like providing feedback this way because it’s so easy to use in conjunction with the UAT Test Plan.

Some comments we received were:

  • Everyone loves variety: “I appreciate the different variations of ‘edit mode’ screens — number pads, number wheels, sliders — very cool!”
  • Placement is everything: “It would be useful if the number or row would be highlighted once I tap it, to ensure that I’m not accidentally tapping another number.”
  • There’s more than meets the eye: “Neat use of the expand/minimize function to view detailed savings for each hospital department.”

User Acceptance Testing Results

After reviewing all of our feedback, we found that ensuring that any product, be it a mobile application or website, is intuitive still serves as the number one priority across the board. Secondly, we know that super cool design is the way to sustain our users’ attention. Finally, users want to be able to correct any potential mistakes that they may make — implementing back/delete/remove buttons is essential.

By reviewing comments and even receiving phone calls from some of our respondents, we were pleased to know that participants in fact enjoy User Acceptance Testing, as it includes them in developing the experience and gives them a firsthand account of what is to come. We know that our users are likely to enjoy the product once it is finally live, and it is even more useful to them knowing that their input is valued and taken seriously. We encourage all of our digital teammates to make great experiences and test test test!

At Consensus Boston, not only are we constantly thinking of ways to amplify the user experience, but also the user testing experience. If you have any thoughts, suggestions, or would even like some help, please reach out! We live for this! #LoveTheExperience